NEW FEATURE NOW LIVE

Leaderboards are an exciting new way to play and compete amongst friends and other Shot Scope users from all over the world. Combined with the Medals feature released last month, Leaderboards are generated based upon points earned from unlocked Medals.

Play a round, unlock Medals then climb up the Leaderboard. See where you rank against your friends, stimulating a little extra competition each time you play. The incentive is to beat your friends, and make sure your friends know about it! Have competitions within competitions to see who can knock the longest drive out there or hole the longest putt.

There are also Leaderboards for more detailed statistics; such as Approach Proximity, Short Game in the Red Zone and One-Putt Percentage.

The main Leaderboard categories are; Driving, Approaches, Short Game, Putting, Scoring, Medal Points. See the table below for all Leaderboards within those categories…

As ever Shot Scope are always looking to improve the user experience. Over time we aim to develop different types of Leaderboards, enhancing the Shot Scope user experience.

Leaderboards allow for users to interact amongst their friends, and users all over the world. They can try to beat that ridiculously low round by someone in a different country, or more simply, have the lowest round out of their group of friends. The Leaderboards can be used in whatever way the user wishes, it will be entirely up to them how much they interact with the feature.

Bringing interactive and innovative features to Shot Scope V2 separates the product from its competitors. The only GPS and Performance Tracking Golf Watch to offer this level of user competition post round.

Is Brooks Koepka the most underrated golfer?

Some of you may ask – who’s Brooks Koepka? Where has he been all this time? Well, let me tell you a little secret…. Brooks Koepka is the new World No.1 and has won 12 times worldwide! He has won 2 of the 4 Majors in 2018 with a total of 3 Majors in his last 6 played – I don’t know about you but that is an outrageous winning % in Major Championships!!

Nonetheless, all you hear about in the media is the rise of Tiger Woods, and is he ‘back’? Will Dustin Johnston or Speith or Thomas win the next event? Will Rory return to form? Or rather more light heartedly, when will Phil the Thrill start his own dance classes?!

 

Anyway back to Koepka, see how easy it is to get sucked in by all these other big names?! Brooks Koepka is arguably one of the most underrated players currently on the PGA Tour! With back to back US Open wins and 3 Majors in his last 6 attempts you’d think you would see him all over the media, but sadly that is not the case. In Koepka’s Major history he has only ever missed 2 cuts out of 20, yes 2!! AND they were his first two Major tournaments.

Brooks is known for his athletic build and powerful drives, with his longest drive this season at a whopping 411 yards!! That’s longer than most of the Par 4s us regular golfers play – the team at Shot Scope know this, as we map every course on our system! Shot Scope V2 automatically tracks every shot you hit on the course, find out if you can smash one as far Brooks with Shot Scope V2.

 

With a 2018 scoring average of 69.4 (ranks 9th) we should all expect to see Brooks challenging in every tournament he plays. Scoring average combined with his ball striking is why Brooks is ever consistent in non-majors too. This season he has made 16/18 cuts, with 2 runners up placings and 6 top 10s. With his recent CJ Cup win (12th win worldwide) Brooks is now the Official World Golf No. 1!

After all his (rather unheard of) success it seems fitting for Brooks to be awarded 2018 Player of the Year! Congratulations Brooks! It is also nice to see the likes of Justin Thomas and Dustin Johnson congratulating Brooks on his title! The camaraderie and sportsmanship within the golfing world is unique to golf.

THE RYDER CUP 2018

Every two years golfers become these die hard, football like hooligans for the event that is arguably the best golfing event ever…. The Ryder Cup! 12 Europeans, 12 Americans, 2 Captains, hundreds of thousands of fans and whole lot of patriotism. The excitement that surrounds this biennial event grows time upon time! Bigger crowds, louder crowds, and an astonishing atmosphere.

Being selected to play in The Ryder Cup brings players great pride. A quote from European Team rookie Tommy Fleetwood:

“This morning when I got up and put my uniform on is the proudest moment of my career”

Tommy highlights just how much it means to these world class players to represent their respective continent in The Ryder Cup.

This year the 2018 Ryder Cup was held at Le Golf National in Paris. The first tee is always an exciting place to be for tee off, but never more so than this year in the 7,000 person grandstand behind the tee!!! One can only imagine the nerves and adrenaline pumping through the players as they walk out onto that first tee. It was none other than USA rookie Tony Finau who got play underway on the Friday morning four-balls, a nerve wracking task for anyone – nevermind a rookie!

Team USA got off to a hot start taking the morning four-balls 3-1. However what happened that afternoon not only flipped the scoreboard but will be remembered in the history books… Europe won all 4 foursome matches to take a 4-3 lead after day one. Over the duration of the weekend the European team showed their class and continued that Friday afternoon form. Zero Ryder Cup points between them before the 2018 event, Tommy Fleetwood and Francesco Molinari went 4/4 in their unstoppable pairing – the first ever European pairing to do so! ‘Moliwood’ will undoubtedly be a force to be reckoned with in many Ryder Cups to come!!

With the strong showing from ‘Moliwood’ coupled with the fact that every player on the European team gained at least 1 full point –Team Europe went on to win The 2018 Ryder Cup 17 ½ – 10 ½. Team Europe were the underdogs going into this year with 5/12 players being ‘rookies’ and Team USA full of ‘on-form’ players. Although in today’s golfing world these guys are classed as ‘rookies’ for the Ryder Cup, we need to remember that they are actually extremely successful golfers, some of the best in the world, which deal with the nerves and pressure placed upon them every tournament.

A Ryder Cup to remember. Excited to see what the 2020 Ryder Cup brings!

The Qualities of a Perfect Texas Scramble Team?

To be successful in a texas scramble you need to have 2 key players in your team. A long driver and an extremely strong putter. Getting a long ball in play off the tee greatly increases the chance of a birdie, stick the approach in close and knock in the putt. Easy.

To win a scramble you need to make every putt that you ‘should’ make, as well as holing a few longer unexpected putts. Putting is vital within a texas scramble. Golf always comes down to ‘drive for show, putt for dough’, the famous phrase throughout the golfing world. As a team you get 4 attempts at the same putt, so if you want to shoot low, one of you has to hole the putt!

Having someone who can hit the ball miles is great, but it also benefits the team to have someone who can hit more consistently down the middle of the fairway. Let the accurate driver hit before everyone else, so that the rest of the team can give it that little bit extra – knowing that there is already one ball safe and in play takes the pressure off.

Sometimes having a female in the team gives an upper hand over teams without one. If they can knock a drive well down there off the forward ladies tee, it hugely benefits everyone in the team.

 

Our Texas Scramble Team

Gavin Jamie Neil Jen
Handicap +1 3 4 0
Av. Score to par 2.3 5.2 4.2 1.7
Strength Driving (distance) Long approaches Putting Driving (accuracy)
Weakness Chipping Putting Long approaches Long approaches

 

Our strategy

Gavin can smack drives a long long way down the hole which will make our approach play shorter. Neil is an outstanding putter with the ability to knock in putts from all over the green. Jamie will attack the par 5s with the accuracy of his long approach play. Jen will utilise the advantage of playing from the ladies tees by knocking drives further up the middle.

Given we are all category one golfers, we should be hitting every green in regulation (or better) as we will have 4 attempts at hitting each green. Chipping is a weak side for our team, however our strengths should outweigh this and ideally we will have no chip shots.

Look out for our blog next week about our (hopefully) winning formula.

What do you think of our team?

5 REASONS WHY A GOLFER SHOULD TRACK THEIR PERFORMANCE

Want to beat your friends in the weekly medal? Lower your handicap? Win the club championship? Win a national title?

To succeed at whatever your golfing goal may be, you need to know the strengths, weaknesses and intricate details of your game. Shot Scope V2 allows for detailed statistics to be produced, thus enabling you to enhance your game and achieve that goal!

 

1 – Understand the truth about your game

Tracking your game helps to ensure you understand what you are capable of and what your strengths and weaknesses are. Discover; average number of fairways, greens in regulation, putts per round, as well as average carry distance with each club and many more intricate statistics that help give you a better understanding of your game.

 

2 – Play Smarter

Shot Scope V2 allows you to make better informed decisions. See bunkers 220 yards away on both sides of the fairway? After analysing your statistics, you know your driver carries 200 yards and runs out to 230 yards. Why not hit a 3 wood or hybrid instead, which you know will not reach the fairway bunkers? Knowing how far on average you carry each club allows for better club selection off the tee, and approaching the green. For example, you could discover that on average you hit it closer from 80 yards than you do from 50. So why not lay up to 80 yards if you get in a bit of trouble, or are laying up on a par 5?

 

3 – Practice Your Weaknesses

Tracking your statistics allows for you to pinpoint the strengths and weaknesses of your game. For example, your stats show you hit 12/14 fairways regularly, but average 38 putts a round. Why not switch the range session for an hour on the putting green? The good old saying ‘drive for show, putt for dough’ comes to mind.

 

4 – Set Goals

Tracking your performance allows for you to set mini performance goals based upon your statistics. For example if you usually hit 8 greens in regulation per round, your goal could be to hit 10 the next time you play. Another example could be, reducing your average number of putts per round to less than 30.

 

5 – Monitor Improvements

After having tracked your game and focussed your practice on your weaker areas, you will be able to see if you have made any improvements or met any goals. Again, after switching those range sessions to putting sessions, you will be able to see that you now average less putts per round. Subsequently, leading to a reduced score, or more wins against your friends.

Combined, these 5 reasons ‘why you should track your performance’ all contribute to an improved overall performance. Improving performance with Shot Scope V2 will enable goals to be obtained and make those precious victories more frequent and easier to come by.

Sizing up the Green Jacket for 2017

The 2017 Masters kicks off today and since all golf fans enjoy making a prediction on who will win the first major of the season we have delved into some of the key statistics to try and pick out some potential winners. Looking at the previous years at Augusta National, there are a few statistics that stand out amongst others as being important to having a strong week. The first of these is Average Driving Distance, Augusta has always been a course that favours long hitters and this year will be no different, especially if the wet forecast is to be believed.  A second key stat is average proximity to the hole with approach shots, hitting greens is important at every tournament, however, with the extreme difficulty of getting the ball up and down at Augusta it makes hitting greens paramount. The third and final statistic that will be used to predict this year’s green jacket winner is Par 5 scoring average, the par 5’s at Augusta are all reachable in two and therefore it is imperative that you take advantage of the par 5’s over the week.

It may come as a surprise that a putting statistic is not included when trying to predict this year’s winner, however, putting is actually of less importance at Augusta than it is other weeks on tour. This was shown in 2014 with Bubba Watson not even ranking in the top 10 for putting on his route to victory.

In order to make our predictions, we tallied together the 2017 stat ranking for each player in average driving distance, average proximity to the hole and Par 5 scoring average.

And here are the top 5 predictions from our formula:

Player Driving Distance Proximity to the hole Par 5 Scoring Average Total
Rory Mcilroy 1 6 1 8
Dustin Johnson 2 3 6 11
Sergio Garcia 18 24 13 55
Hideki Matsuyama 23 36 2 61
Jon Rahm 21 20 27 68

Do you think we’ve picked a winner? Let us know who you’re backing for the green jacket in the comments below.

Happy Master week!

 

– Ally Millar, Commercial Assistant

 

What makes the 12th at Augusta so difficult?

The 12th hole at Augusta, known as The Golden Bell, is the shortest hole on the course,t measuring just 155-yards. However, what this hole lacks in length, it certainly makes up for in difficulty. The 12th has claimed its fair share of Masters hopefuls over the years and with a stroke average of 3.28 showing just how difficult the world’s elite have found this little par 3. Jack Nicklaus even claimed that the 12th is the hardest hole on tour.

So, what makes this par 3 so difficult? First of all, the hole is protected by water at the front of the green meaning anything short will tumble back down into the water. It has bunkers at the front and back which both leave difficult up and downs. However, the main difficulty of the short par 3 is the tricky swirling winds that it produces, with players finding it almost impossible to judge the direction and speed of the wind. Tiger Woods once stated that he picks how far he wants to hit the ball, selects the club and then hopes he doesn’t get a gust of wind. This shows just how difficult it is to select the right club. However, executing the tee shot is not the end of the difficulty, the green is also one of the hardest on the course to read due to the shade created by the overhanging trees.

It is fair to say that The Golden Bell has provided plenty of drama and unforgettable moments over the years and we look forward to seeing what will unfold at the little par 3 this year.

You still have time to enter the Shot Scope Masters competition over on our Facebook. Just tell us, in the comments on the pinned post, how many birdies you think will be on the 12th at this year’s Masters for your chance to win a Shot Scope!

– Ally Millar, Commercial Assistant

Shooting at high altitude

With the WGC – Mexico Championship being held at Chapultepec Golf Club in Mexico City, there has been greater talk of the effect of altitude on the golf ball than ever before. The Chapultepec Golf Club sits 7,835 feet above sea level at its highest point, thereby making it the highest PGA Tour venue of all time.
Most golfers have an understanding that the ball flies further when playing at altitude and this is true. The ball will carry a greater distance at altitude due to the decrease in air density which therefore makes it easier for the ball to fly through the air. The exact impact on distance is hard to calculate however a rough calculation shows that the ball will fly an extra 9%, compared to sea level, at the Chapultepec Golf Club.
The increase in distance this week was evident in round one with there being 39 drives over 350 yards and a longest drive of 387 yards by Jhonattan Vegas. More startling perhaps though was the distance that irons were being hit, with Dustin Johnson hitting a 2-iron pin high with his tee shot on a 332-yard par 4.
Although many of you will be sitting thinking that an extra 9% distance to your shots would be great, it also comes with its difficulties. Along with the increased distance, the ball also flies at a lower trajectory making the ball harder to stop on the green. On top of this, the altitude also makes clubbing much more difficult as the extra distance you get can depend greatly on the type of shot you hit and the distance each shot goes can vary greatly. The difficulty of clubbing was highlighted by Thomas Pieters who, in practice, hit one 9-iron 190 metres and the next 9-iron 160 metres.
So before everyone starts looking for a new golf course at altitude, just remember, the extra distance also comes with its fair share of difficulties.

– Ally Millar, Commerical Assistant

Ryder Cup : Should the Qualifying Requirements for Team Europe Change?

Ever since Europe lost to the US team in the first time since 2008 at Hazeltine, there have been lots of grumblings as to why? The US team played some phenomenal golf and were the rightful winners but the European team on paper were just as strong if not stronger. The European team consisted of the current Open champion, Olympic gold medalist, the Masters champion and the Fedex Cup Champion surely that’s an unbeatable team, unfortunately they were prove otherwise.

So what happened? Well recently a few players have said that Team Europe needs to re-evaluate how the qualifying system works. This is understandable as somebody might win a tournament early in the season way before the Ryder Cup but that doesn’t mean their current form is worthy. The other defence for the change is that two players within the top 20 in the world did not qualify. This is because in order to automatically qualify for those 9 magic spots, one you need to be a member of the European Tour and two you need to play in events on the European tour to gain enough points.

A lot of people argue that if Paul Casey and Russell Knox really wanted a spot on the team they would have made the sacrifice, but should a player really have to sacrifice tournaments and their career on the PGA Tour for a Ryder Cup place, for a place in a team that they rightfully should already be in?

Rory McIlroy and Lee Westwood have both spoken out in favour of a change to the current format. They understand why the tour wants European tour players only but it is difficult when you are missing out on world class European players in America. The Ryder Cup is a world stage tournament so the best players from Europe and USA should be included.

In the end all European players are still from Europe no matter their personal choice on what tour they play on or the country they live in. What tour they play on does not suddenly change their nationality nor does it change their passion for the game and the passion they would show granted a spot representing their continent.

By Rachael McQueen, Community Engagement Executive at Shot Scope

World Super Six Perth – a new era or a one hit wonder?

The big news from the golf world this week comes from down under. The ISPS HANDA PGA Tour of Australasia and European Tour announced on Wednesday that the Perth International, which began in 2012, will be replaced by the World Super 6 Perth. The revolutionary new tournament will be held at Lake Karrinyup Country Club from the 16th-19th of February 2017 and will be co-sanctioned by both the PGA Tour of Australasia and the European Tour. There will be a complete format shake up at this event, which has caused quite a stir within the golf industry, with three days of stroke play followed by a final day of six-hole match play.
For the first three rounds nothing much will change – there will be 54 holes of stroke play and the usual 36-hole cut. On the Saturday afternoon, however, there will be a further cut that will leave only the top 24 players to go into the final round on Sunday. Any ties will be sorted out with a play-off and those 24 remaining players will then contest a six-hole match play shootout. This is where the ‘Knockout Hole’ is introduced and will determine the outcome of any matches tied after the six holes have been played. Purpose built for this event, the Knockout Hole is a 90m hole using a new tee that will be positioned adjacent to the 18th fairway and using the 18th green. It will be played only once and, if there is a tie, the players will head back to the tee for a nearest-the-pin shootout to determine the winner. The victor will then go on to the next round of the match play or, in the case of the final match, be crowned the winner of the tournament.
There is every chance that this type of golf tournament will come down to the wire, with nail-biting finales and all-or-nothing performances demanded on the Knockout Hole. It is exactly this drama which has prompted the change, with the hopes to appeal to a wider audience and engage them with this new format. European Tour Chief Executive Keith Pelley has had plans for just such a shake up for a while, announcing in July that they were looking into a six-hole format on the Tour.
Essentially this will be the golfing equivalent of the Rugby7’s – a chance to engage a fresh audience in fast paced and exciting sport.  It has been designed to remain true to golf and its rich history but to also answer calls for innovation to keep the game ‘relevant’ to modern audiences. It is no coincidence that Pelley is one of the frontrunners looking to see the game adapt and develop a shorter format, and this focus is obviously producing results.
The Perth World Super Six will be a different kind of golf, a different kind of test and hopes to attract a different kind of audience. The “aggressive and attacking” style of play is hoped to draw in the younger crowd. But what do the current golfing fans think of it? Over on the Shot Scope Facebook we’ve heard from some of you who think it might be more interesting to play but not, necessarily, to watch… There is only one way to find out, February 19th is marked in the diary and we’ll be waiting to see how this pans out.