World Super Six Perth – a new era or a one hit wonder?

The big news from the golf world this week comes from down under. The ISPS HANDA PGA Tour of Australasia and European Tour announced on Wednesday that the Perth International, which began in 2012, will be replaced by the World Super 6 Perth. The revolutionary new tournament will be held at Lake Karrinyup Country Club from the 16th-19th of February 2017 and will be co-sanctioned by both the PGA Tour of Australasia and the European Tour. There will be a complete format shake up at this event, which has caused quite a stir within the golf industry, with three days of stroke play followed by a final day of six-hole match play.
For the first three rounds nothing much will change – there will be 54 holes of stroke play and the usual 36-hole cut. On the Saturday afternoon, however, there will be a further cut that will leave only the top 24 players to go into the final round on Sunday. Any ties will be sorted out with a play-off and those 24 remaining players will then contest a six-hole match play shootout. This is where the ‘Knockout Hole’ is introduced and will determine the outcome of any matches tied after the six holes have been played. Purpose built for this event, the Knockout Hole is a 90m hole using a new tee that will be positioned adjacent to the 18th fairway and using the 18th green. It will be played only once and, if there is a tie, the players will head back to the tee for a nearest-the-pin shootout to determine the winner. The victor will then go on to the next round of the match play or, in the case of the final match, be crowned the winner of the tournament.
There is every chance that this type of golf tournament will come down to the wire, with nail-biting finales and all-or-nothing performances demanded on the Knockout Hole. It is exactly this drama which has prompted the change, with the hopes to appeal to a wider audience and engage them with this new format. European Tour Chief Executive Keith Pelley has had plans for just such a shake up for a while, announcing in July that they were looking into a six-hole format on the Tour.
Essentially this will be the golfing equivalent of the Rugby7’s – a chance to engage a fresh audience in fast paced and exciting sport.  It has been designed to remain true to golf and its rich history but to also answer calls for innovation to keep the game ‘relevant’ to modern audiences. It is no coincidence that Pelley is one of the frontrunners looking to see the game adapt and develop a shorter format, and this focus is obviously producing results.
The Perth World Super Six will be a different kind of golf, a different kind of test and hopes to attract a different kind of audience. The “aggressive and attacking” style of play is hoped to draw in the younger crowd. But what do the current golfing fans think of it? Over on the Shot Scope Facebook we’ve heard from some of you who think it might be more interesting to play but not, necessarily, to watch… There is only one way to find out, February 19th is marked in the diary and we’ll be waiting to see how this pans out.

True Test at Troon

The Open, the oldest major in golf, is set to be held at Royal Troon this week. The championship length is 7,190 yards and is a par 71. The course is host to deceivingly tight fairways, wispy long grass, gorse and tricky pot hole bunkers.

Most people describe Royal Troon as a game of two halves. The front nine gives the impression it is wide open with its lack of trees or gorse but the fairways are lined with tall wispy rough and perfectly placed bunkers to collect any off line tee shot. The back nine on the other hand has more gorse lined fairways especially in the loop 9th, 10th 11th and 12th. There are less bunkers on the back nine 36 bunkers to be exact, versus the 60 bunkers that defend the front nine.

Royal Troon’s most famous hole is the par 3 Postage Stamp. It is the shortest hole in championship golf at a mere 123 yards, but don’t let its length fool you. The tee box is raised above the green making it very open to the elements. If the wind is coming straight off the Firth of Clyde the hole suddenly becomes longer. You have to carry your shot over a grassy gully onto a long but very narrow green. The green is surrounded by five bunkers, one that is rightfully named the Coffin bunker due to its deep but narrow characteristics. This short hole is not a guaranteed par and has seen a few high scores in its Open championship history. In 1997 a young 21-year-old Tiger Woods walked off the 8th green with a triple bogey six after finding a bunker with his tee shot.

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Does Golf Have a Future in The Olympics

Ever since Rory’s announcement that he will not be playing in the Rio Olympics, there has been a growing concern that other influential players will now follow suit. The World No.4 is definitely the highest profile player that has been added to the list of players that are opting out on this year’s games. The list seems to be growing creating a growing concern for golf continuing in the Olympics.

The players that have pulled out have cited that it was due to the risk of the Zika virus, a virus that is known to cause birth defects and currently has no cure. The men’s tournament is planned to take place on August 11th to the 14th with the women’s tournament taking place the following week. This comes at the busiest time during the PGA season, and as much it is a huge honour to play for their country there is no money involved for the players.

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Rory Returns to Major Winning Putting Grip

A lot of people were questioning the young Irish player’s decision on returning to a conventional putting grip but after his performance last week at Memorial it seems to have been the correct decision. This past week at Muirfield Village, Rory McIIlroy returned his best 4 round average for strokes gained putting in his career. The 1.826 SGP average helped him finish T-4th at The Memorial Tournament and he finished 3rd for strokes gained putting in the field that week.

The four-time major winner hasn’t exactly had misfortune with putting left-hand-low this season and that is why making this change so close to the second major of the year is questionable. Rory started putting left-hand-low after a missed cut at the Honda Classic and since then has finished T-3, T-27, 4, T-10, T-4, T-12 and importantly also won the Irish Open with the unconventional grip. All fantastic results and so far seems to be having a very strong 2016 season. So why the change?

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